News - Study

New Study: Up to 4.6 million people potentially affected by hydropower plans in the Balkans

 07/20/2021

Hydropower plants and dams have detrimental effects on river ecosystems, but they also affect people in negative ways. In a recent study, researchers from the CALTUS Institute Namibia presented a newly developed model to assess the number of people potentially affected by already operating, under construction and planned hydropower projects (HPPs) in the Balkan region.

Legal Toolkit on how to protect rivers from hydropower development released

 04/22/2021

We are happy to present the Legal Toolkit which provides guidance to activists and civil society organisations in navigating the possibilities for legal actions in river protection. The toolkit will be presented on 29 April (2-4 pm CET) in a webinar. We will be happy to answer your questions and receive feedback on the toolkit.

New Study: Biodiversity, potential impacts, and legal framework for hydropower development of the Vjosa

 04/13/2021

This baseline survey summarises the value of the Vjosa River system as one of the few remaining reference sites for dynamic floodplains in Europe on the one hand, and reveals the detrimental effects dams could have on the river system on the other. Only one dam will significantly destroy the ecological continuum of a pristine river.

New study: Evaluating the energy contribution of small hydropower in the Mediterranean Basin

 01/14/2021

In a recent study, researchers of NOVA University Lisbon evaluated the economic viability and energy productivity of existing and planned small hydropower projects in the European Mediterranean region. They found that currently, they can cover at best 2.6% of gross electricity consumption and 0.47% of primary energy consumption. The real contribution is likely much lower.

Hydropower projects on Balkan Rivers: 2020 Update

 12/22/2020

Every two years, we analyse the situation of hydropower development in the Balkans, updating the data of existing and planned hydropower plants as well as those currently under construction. Since the last update of this kind in 2018, another 300 HPPs came into operation, leaving hundreds of kilometres of rivers and streams devastated.

Death by a thousand cuts: Black Catalogue of small hydropower plants

 12/18/2020

In Europe, 91 percent of the planned 8,000 hydropower plants are “small”. But what do small dams really look like and how do they affect nature and species around them? Not many people have ever seen a small dam scheme. This is why we prepared this catalogue visualizing the effects of small hydro with drone footage of existing dams.

Fishes in Mediterranean region endangered due to hydropower boom

 07/08/2020

Hydropower plants are one of the main causes for the decline of numerous fish species in the Mediterranean region. This is the result of a new study. In total, 251 endangered freshwater fish species along with their stock situation in rivers in the Mediterranean basin were recorded. The impact of existing and planned hydropower plants on these populations was also evaluated.

New Vjosa-Aoos Studies

 05/18/2020

On her first 70 km, the Vjosa flows through Greece territory and is called Aoos. The last 20 km towards the border with Albania remain unprotected. These two studies commissioned by Pindos Perivallontiki provide evidence of the region’s biological importance as well as the need for a transboundary Wild River National Park and show that further development of hydropower is not necessary to reach the RES development goals.

Europe’s rivers are damned by dams: Plans for more than 8,700 new hydropower plants

 11/27/2019

The first pan-European inventory of existing and planned hydropower plants shows the immense pressure on rivers throughout the continent. In addition to the 21,387 existing hydropower plants, another 8,785 are planned, mainly in the Alps and the Balkans. Devastating impacts on biodiversity and society are to be expected.

New report: hydropower subsidies wreak environmental havoc and line influential pockets in the Western Balkans

Disproportionate public subsidies for small hydropower in the Western Balkans have resulted in widespread environmental damage and have benefited wealthy business people close to or part of the region’s governments, with little benefit for electricity generation, finds a new study released today by CEE Bankwatch Network.

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